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1 lives in California
1 lives in District Of Columbia
2 live in Florida
6 live in Georgia
7 live in Maryland
1 lives in Massachusetts
1 lives in Michigan
2 live in New Jersey
3 live in New York
17 live in North Carolina
1 lives in South Carolina
1 lives in Texas
7 live in Virginia
313 location unknown
106 are deceased

UPCOMING BIRTHDAYS



•   Nathaniel Powell  3/7
•   Nancy Waddell (Best)  3/21

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The Class of 1968

'Celebrating 50 years'

 SAVE THESE DATES! 

MAY 11 -13, 2018

50TH CLASS REUNION_

__________

        File:Alma Adams official portrait.jpg   

Then                                                             Now

Alma Adams

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Alma Shealey Adams (born May 27, 1946) is an American politician who represents North Carolina's 12th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. A Democrat, Adams served as a member of the North Carolina General Assembly representing the state's 58th House district in Guilford County from her appointment in April 1994 until her election to Congress. A college administrator and art professor from Greensboro, Adams is known for the many distinctive hats that she wears (she claims to own 900).[2] Adams won the 2014 special election in North Carolina's 12th congressional district to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Mel Watt, thus becoming the 100th woman serving in the 113th Congress. She won election to a full two-year term at the same time.

 Early life and education[edit]

Adams was born on May 27, 1946 in High Point, North Carolina. Her parents were Benjamin Shealey and the former Mattie Stokes. She graduated from West Side High School in Newark, New Jersey, in 1964. Adams received her B.S. degree in 1969 and her M.S. degree in 1972, both from North Carolina A&T University and both in Art Education. She continued her studies to receive her Ph.D. in Art Education/Multicultural Education from Ohio State University in 1981.[5][6]

Political career[edit]

State legislature[edit]

Adams was previously a member of the Greensboro City School Board from 1984 to 1986 and a Greensboro City Council member from 1987 until her appointment to the House seat in 1994.[5][7]

She was originally appointed to the North Carolina House District 26 seat in 1994 to replace Herman Gist, who died in office. The district is located in Guilford County and includes most of southeastern Greensboro. She had previously already announced that she was going to challenge Gist for that seat in the Democratic primary that year.[7] After being appointed to the seat, Adams faced conservative businessman and retired engineer O. C. Stafford in the Democratic primary. Stafford was a perennial candidate who had run for various offices, sometimes as a Democrat and other times as a Republican. He previously had challenged Gist as a Republican in the 1992 general election. In 1994, running as a Democrat,[8] he was defeated by Adams in the primary.

Adams went on to win a full term in the general election, beating Republican Roger G. Coffer. She faced a rematch with Stafford in the general elections of 1996 and 1998 when Stafford ran as a Republican.[9] Adams won both elections.[10][11] In 2000 Adams did not have an opponent in the Democratic primary; she defeated Republican real estate broker Jim Rumley in the general election.[12][13]

In 2002, after redistricting, Adams' seat was changed from the 26th district to the 58th district. Her only challenger that year was Libertarian lawyer David Williams, who withdrew from the race in October because he was moving to Colorado.[14] His name still appeared on the ballot, but Adams won with nearly 86% of the vote.[15]

Adams has been challenged for her seat for many years by Republican legal assistant and party activist Olga Morgan Wright.[16] Wright has run for the seat held by Adams in nearly every election since 2004. Adams defeated Wright and Libertarian challenger Walter Sperko with 66% of the vote in 2004.[17] In the next election Adams had no competition in the primary; she defeated Wright in the general election 66%–34%.[18] In 2008, the year that Barack Obama was elected president, Democratic voters had a high rate of participation, and Adams defeated Wright 71.35%–28.65%[19]

In 2008, Adams was elected to a second term as chair of the North Carolina Legislative Black Caucus.[20]

She was vice-chair of the Government Committee in the state House.[21] Previously she was chair of the Appropriations Committee as well as vice-chair of the Commerce, Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee.[5]

In 2010, Adams was challenged in the Democratic primary by Ralph C. Johnson. She defeated Johnson with 76.56% of the vote.[22] Adams next faced Republican Darin H. Thomas in the general election, beating him 63.15%–36.85%.[23] In 2012, Adams did not have any primary opposition and defeated Olga Wright in the general election by an even wider margin than 2008, 79.86%–20.14%.[24]

Congress[edit]

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2014 § District 12; and North Carolina's 12th congressional district special election, 2014

In April 2013, Mel Watt, the only congressman to have served the 12th District since its creation in 1993, was appointed as director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency. Adams was one of the first to announce that if Watt were confirmed, she would run in the ensuing special election. After Watt was confirmed in December, Adams formally filed paperwork to run in both the Democratic primary for a full two-year term in the 114th Congress and the special election for the balance of Watt's 11th term.[25]

Analysts thought that Adams was at a geographic disadvantage in the five-way primary for both the special and regular elections (held on the same day). She is from Greensboro, but the bulk of the district's population is in Charlotte. The three Charlotteans in the race split that region's vote; and Adams won both primaries with approximately 44 percent of the vote, a few thousand votes over the 40 percent threshold needed to avoid a runoff. She faced Republican Vince Coakley, a former television and radio broadcaster from Matthews, in both the general and special elections, which were held on the same day in November. The 12th was a heavily Democratic district with a majority-black voting population and a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+26, and Adams was overwhelmingly favored in the general election. She won both handily.

Adams is the second woman of color to represent North Carolina in the House. The first was Eva Clayton, who represented much of eastern North Carolina from 1992 to 2002.

In the 2016 presidential election, Adams endorsed Hillary Clinton and pledged her support as a superdelegate.[26]

Adams decided not to attend the January 2017 Inauguration of Donald Trump

She is a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.[33]

Other work[edit]

Adams has been a professor of art at Bennett College in Greensboro, as well as the director of the Steel Hall Art Gallery.[5] In 1990, Adams helped co-found, with Eva Hamlin Miller, the African American Atelier, an organization established to advance awareness and appreciation for visual arts and cultures of African Americans.[34]

She is the chairperson of the North Carolina Legislative Black Caucus Foundation, which gives scholarships to students who are attending one of North Carolina's Historically Black Colleges and Universities.[35]

Personal life[edit]

Adams is divorced and has two children.[5][6] She is well noted for the many distinctive hats that she wears

_____________________________________________________________________

Rev. Edward M. Anderson - Anderson Ministries of Wilkes County Mission: to affirm the presence of God in ordinary people, who have accomplished extraordinary things, by uplifting their lives through writing, teaching, and preaching.

Then                                                                        Now

 

 

Rev. Edward M. Anderson, Sr.

A native of Wilkes County, Georgia, Ed Anderson, Sr. was educated in the public schools of Wilkes County and Charlotte-Mecklenburg County, N.C.  He is a Distinguished Military Graduate of North Carolina A&T State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics.

He is a law school graduate and a licensed attorney who is a retired Lieutenant Colonel from the Army JAG Corps.  Additionally, he is a seminary graduate and an ordained Baptist minister who serves as Assistant Pastor in his church.  Moreover, he is “all but dissertation” on his Ed.D. in Educational Administration, and is a retired public and Christian school educator.

He recently retired after successfully serving as the first African American Municipal Court Judge in his ancestral home county – Wilkes County, Georgia and the Toombs Judicial Circuit.  Ed Anderson, Sr. is the Founder of Anderson Ministries of Wilkes County and the author of  “Unsung Heroes of Wilkes County, Georgia”and Fifty Years Later: The Class of 1964 of West Charlotte Senior High School.

___________________________________

 

HELLLO 1968 CLASSMATES,

IT'S HERE ... YES, BELIEVE IT OR NOT OUR 50TH CLASS REUNION IS HERE IN 2018.

WE INVITE YOU TO COME BACK TO A&T AND HAVE THE BEST REUNION OF ALL TIME!

LOOK FOR A CALL OR CARD IN THE NEAR FUTURE TO UPDATE YOU ON THE ACTIVITIES PLANNED.

A CLASSMATE WILL BE IN TOUCH SOON.

AGGIEPRIDE,

JESSIE BARNES

Chair, Class of 1968 50th Reunion Committee

CLASS OF 1968

jsldancer@gmail.com 

 ------------------------------------------

NC A&T SCORES IN LAST MINUTE TO BEAT GRAMBLING STATE 21-14, WIN 2ND CELEBRATION BOWL

Posted on  by Grayson Moore

ATLANTA — Lamar Raynard scored on a 1-yard sneak with 38 seconds left and unbeaten North Carolina A&T won its second Celebration Bowl in three years, defeating Grambling State 21-14 on Saturday.

N.C. A&T (12-0) won its fourth Historically Black College and University national championship. The Aggies claimed titles in 1990 and 1999 in addition to 2015, when they defeated Alcorn State 41-34 in the first Celebration Bowl.

Raynard, one of four finalists for the Black College Hall of Fame player of the year, completed 23 of 43 passes for 225 yards and a touchdown and had 17 yards on eight carries.

The junior quarterback drove the Aggies 56 yards in seven plays for the winning touchdown, shaking off nearly throwing his third interception. Grambling (11-2) challenged, but the pass was ruled incomplete.

Grambling was trying for a second straight HBCU national title as the Tigers edged North Carolina Central 10-9 last year.

Grambling quarterback DeVante Kincade, also a finalist for player of the year, completed 19 of 36 passes for 225 yards and two touchdowns while also scrambling for 93 yards on the ground.

Franklin McCain III ended a Grambling drive following the second-half kickoff with an interception at the goal line and N.C. A&T marched down the field to go ahead 14-7 on Marquell Cartwright‘s 30-yard run.

Grambling tied it early in the fourth quarter as Martez Carter teamed with Kincade on a 29-yard TD pass to cap an 80-yard drive.

N.C. A&T’s Lyndemian Brooks recovered a fumble at the Grambling 8 in the fourth quarter, but the Aggies came up empty when Cartwright tried to punch it in from a yard out on fourth down and was stopped by defensive end Brandon Varner.

Grambling went six plays on its final drive of the game but Kincade’s pass over the middle was incomplete as time expired.

THE TAKEAWAY

N.C. A&T: The Aggies became the first MEAC team to go undefeated for an entire season as they continued their run of success under coach Rod Broadway. N.C. A&T is 40-8 with two HBCU national titles in four seasons under Broadway.

Grambling State: The Tigers are back despite failing in their bid for consecutive HBCU national title. Grambling is 38-11 in four seasons under head coach Broderick Fobbs, a former Tigers captain who was hired after the team went 2-21 over two years amid player turmoil.

COACHING CONNECTIONS

Both head coaches have a deep connection with the other team. A&T’s Broadway spent four years at Grambling, leading the Tigers to the 2008 HBCU national championship. Grambling running backs coach Lee Fobbs, the father of coach Broderick Fobbs, was A&T’s head coach from 2006-08.

North Carolina A&T caps 12-0 season with Celebration Bowl win after fake spike trick play

"The Aggies are HBCU national champions for the second time in three years"

Brett Davis-USA TODAY Sports.

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